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1962 FIFA WORLD CUP
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1962 WORLD CUP - CHILE  
  1962 WORLD CUP CHILE  
                                           
   
                                           
                                         
                           
  We play football. We love football.          
  We breathe football. We live football.        
                         
                                         
                                         
  1962 WORLD CUP  
   

The 1962 FIFA World Cup, the seventh staging of the World Cup, took place in Chile from 30 May to 17 June 1962. 16 teams from 3 confederations participated in the final tournament: 10 from Europe (UEFA), 5 from South America (CONMEBOL), and 1 from North America, Central America and Caribbean (CONCACAF). Two teams made their first World Cup presentation: Bulgaria and Colombia.

This World Cup is considered by experts as one of the most disappointing in the World Cups history, a reputation which was won by the ultra-defensive system of many teams –the catenaccio-, the brutality of several matches included Chile versus Italy which became known as “The Battle of Santiago”, and a limited amount of goals. 89 goals were scored and the average goals per match dropped to 2.78, under 3 for the first time in the history of the competition.  These records are very low if we compare them to 126 goals in 35 games (3.60 goals-per-game) four years earlier in Sweden. One of the best matches of the tournament was played by the reigning European champions the Soviet Union, and Colombia. The Soviet team was leading the match 4-1, but Colombia scored three goals in a ten-minute span to tie the game, including the first and only Olympic goal in any World Cup. The Colombians also completed the biggest comeback to draw in World Cup history. In a World Cup marred by violence, nobody flew higher than the extraordinary Brazilian winger Garrincha.

The 1962 World Cup was won again by the Brazilian team that defeated Czechoslovakia and the great Josef Masopust 3-1 in the final, to achieve the deservedly second World Cup title in a row. Brazil became the second team, after Italy in 1938, to successfully defend the world title. Brazil also joined Uruguay and Italy as the only two-time champions of the world.

 
     
 
 
 
Estadio Nacional de Chile, Santiago
Bobby Moore from England in action against Brazil
 
     
   
Quick facts  
   
  Teams
  16
 Crack
  When
  30 May to 17 June 1962
  Matches
  32
  Venues
  4
  Attendance
  893,172 (average 27,912)
  Goals Scored
  89 (2.78 per match)
 
   
BRAZIL 3-1 CZECHOSLOVAKIA
  Champion
  Brazil
 Golden shoe
1
4
  Runner-up
  Czechoslovakia
4
  Third place
  Chile
4
  Fourth Place
  Yugoslavia
4
 
4
 Best young player
4
 
   
     
  The world in 1962  
   
Alaska and Hawaii are accepted as states in United States (1959).
Charles de Gaulle becomes President of France (1959).
Fidel Castro comes to power in Cuba (1959).
Car seat-belt with three points was introduced by Volvo (1959).
Adolf Eichmann is captured by Mossad agents in Argentina (1959).
People's Republic of China invades Tibet (1959).
Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Cote d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Gabon, Ghana, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Nigeria, Niger, Senegal, Togo, and Zaire gain their Independence (1960).
Brasilia becomes Brazil's national capital (1960).
The OECD is founded in Paris (1960).
Squaw Valley, United States, holds the VIII Winter Olympic Games (1960).
Rome, Italy, holds the XVII Summer Olympic Games (1960).
Soviet Union beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in Paris after extra time and wins the first 1960 UEFA European Nations Cup (1960).
Cassius Clay, Muhammad Ali, wins the gold medal in the light heavyweight division at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome (1960).
World population reaches 3 billons (1960).
John F. Kennedy becomes the 35th President of United States (1961).
United States breaks diplomatic relations with Cuba (1961).
The Bay of Pigs invasion is defeated by Cuba (1961).
Yuri Gagarin becomes the first man in outer space and in orbit around the Earth (1961).
   
 
Cassius Clay (1942)
John F. Kennedy (1917-1963)
Yuri Gagarin (1934-1968)
   
Sierra Leona gains its independence (1961).
Berlin Wall is built (1961).
The Beatles debuts in Hamburg, Germany (1961).
Frank Sinatra and Bob Marley release new albums (1961).
The Rolling Stone and Bob Dylan begin their music career (1961).
Ray Charles, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, and Elvis Presley release new albums (1961).
The first communications satellite is launched into orbit (1962).
The Algerian War ends (1962).
Civil War in Yemen begins (1962).
Cuban missile crisis begins and ends (1962).
Adolf Eichmann executed in Israel (1962).
Pope John XXIII excommunicates Fidel Castro (1962).
   
 
Bob Marley (1945-1981)
Andy Warhol (1928-1987)
Nelson Mandela (1918-2013)
   
Nelson Mandela is arrested in South Africa (1962).
Burundi, Uganda, Jamaica, Rwanda, and Trinidad and Tobago gain their independence (1962).
Andy Warhol exhibits in Los Angeles, California, the Campbell's Soup Can (1962).
Marilyn Monroe Dies (1962).
 
     
   
  Antecedents  
   

Chile was chosen to host the 1962 FIFA World Cup at the FIFA Congress in Lisbon, Portugal, on 10 June 1956. The World Cup would return to South America after 12 years. The American federations had claimed the 1962 edition must be held in South America or face a complete boycott of the tournament. Three nations formally applied to host the 1962 World Cup: Argentina, Chile, and West Germany. There was a tacit agreement that the World Cup could not be held in Europe again, so West Germany withdrew before the vote leaving two remaining bids. In one round of voting, Chile won over the hot favourite, Argentina. Chile's neighbour, Argentina, had better credentials, better infrastructure and a tremendous interest in the game amongst its people, but for some reasons very difficult to understand the balance was tilted toward Chile. The Chilean FA president Carlos Dittborn remembered to the presents the Article 2 of the FIFA statutes that addressed the tournament's role in promoting the sport in countries deemed underdeveloped and famously pleaded to FIFA: “We have nothing that is why we must have the World Cup”, and FIFA agreed. Chile received 32 votes and Argentina received 11 votes. Thirteen members abstained from voting.


The 1960 Valdivia earthquake or Great Chilean earthquake is to date the most powerful earthquake ever recorded, rating 9.5 on the moment magnitude scale.  There were approximately 2,000 deaths and more than 2 million people affected. The earthquake occurred only two years before the 1962 FIFA World Cup and caused enormous damage to national infrastructure. Many of the works being undertaken for the World Cup had to rebuild. The earthquake, in fact, forced the complete overhaul of World Cup programming. Talca, Concepcion, Talcahuano and Valdivia were totally destroyed by the earthquake and therefore were discarded as venues. At the same time, Antofagasta and Valparaíso were also discarded because their stadiums could not be self-financed stadiums, a condition that had to impose the Federation due to the lack of resources. Fortunately, Viña del Mar and Arica raised their hands to be headquarters, and the Braden Copper Company, owner of the El Teniente mine, allowed the organizers to use its stadium in Rancagua. Thus, the 1962 World Cup could be performed.


Dittborn, the man that got the tournament for Chile, did not live to see the success of his efforts, as he died one month before the start of the tournament. The World Cup venue at Arica was named Estadio Carlos Dittborn in his honour and bears his name to this day


FIFA had also a new President: The English Sir Stanley Ford Rous. He was the 6th President of FIFA, where he succeeded Arthur Drewry, serving from 1961 to 1974.

 
   
      
Qualification  
   
  Participating countries:
56
  Withdrew:
5
  Qualified automatically:
2
  Teams that played at least one qualifying match:
49
  Matches:
92
  Total goals:
325 (3.53 per match)
 
     
 

A total of 56 teams signed up to participate in the 1962 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds.  Chile, as the hosts, and Brazil, as the defending champions, qualified automatically.

The qualifying process was completely confused. The winners of North America, Central America and Caribbean (CONCACAF), Africa (CAF) and Asia (AFC) did not qualify directly. They had to play a playoff with teams that failed to qualify directly from Europe and South America. On the other hand, two very important European teams, France and Sweden who were runners-up four years earlier failed to qualify.

The 14 available spots were distributed in continental zones as shown below:

Europe (UEFA): 30 teams (including Cyprus, Israel and Ethiopia) competed for 8 direct places and two spots in the international playoff against teams of AFC and CAF. Romania, Denmark, Iceland and Austria withdrew.
South America (CONMEBOL): 7 teams competed for 3 direct places and one spot in the international playoff against a team of CONCACAF. Paraguay was drawn to play in the CONMEBOL/CONCACAF playoff. Chile, as host country, and Brazil, as defending champion, qualified automatically.
North America, Central America and Caribbean (CONCACAF): 8 teams competed for 1 place in the international playoff against a team of CONMEBOL. Canada withdrew. Mexico advanced to the international playoff after playing 6 games.
Asia (AFC): Indonesia withdrew. South Korea advanced to the international playoff after playing 2 games.
Africa (CAF): 6 teams competed for a place in the international playoff against a team from UEFA. United Arab Republic and Sudan withdrew. Morocco advanced to the international playoff after playing 4 games.
 

International playoffs: teams played against each other on a home-and-away basis. The winners would qualify.

* UEFA/CAF Intercontinental Play-off

  Spain vs. Morocco, Spain qualified winning the two games (0-1, 3-2)

* CONMEBOL/CONCACAF Intercontinental Play-off

  Paraguay vs. Mexico, Mexico qualified winning one game and tying the other (1-0, 0-0)

A total of 49 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 92 qualifying matches were played, and 325 goals were scored (an average of 3.53 per match). The teams that qualified for the World Cup were:

 
Flag
Team
Final Appearance
Streak
Last Appearance
 Argentina
4
2
 Brazil
7
7
 Bulgaria
1
1
 Chile
3
1
 Colombia
1
1
 Czechoslovakia
5
3
 England
4
4
 Italy
5
1
 Hungary
5
3
 Mexico
5
4
 Soviet Union
2
2
 Spain
3
1
 Switzerland
5
1
 Uruguay
4
1
 West Germany
5
3
 Yugoslavia
5
4
 
External link:
RSSSF 1962 FIFA World Cup Qualification
 
     
      
  Format and seedings  
   

The format presented in the 1958 World Cup held in Sweden was retained with some minor changes. One of the main was the goal average that would be used as a means of separating teams with the same amount of points. The sixteen teams were divided in four groups of four teams with the top two advancing to the quarter-finals.  Four teams were seeded: Brazil, England, Italy and Uruguay.

If the top two from each group were equal in points or the second and third teams were equals on points, then goal average would be used to separate any teams equal on points. In the knockout stage, if a match was tied after ninety minutes, then thirty minutes of extra time would be added. If the score was still tied after extra time, then lots would be drawn to determine the winner. This rule would apply to all parties in the knockout stage, except for the final match. The final would have been replayed if tied after extra time. In this World Cup was not necessary any replay or drawing of lots. 

Argentina became the first and only team in World Cup history to be eliminated on goal average. England advanced from Group 4 in second place ahead of Argentina on goal average.

 
     
   
  Squads  
   
For a complete list of all squads that appeared in the 1962 FIFA World Cup, please, visit: 1962 World Cup squads

 
     
   
  Venues  
   
Four cities hosted matches. The Host Cities for the 1962 FIFA World Cup were Santiago, Viña del Mar, Rancagua, and Arica.
 
 
Overall capacity: 66,660
Overall capacity: 18,000
Overall capacity: 18,000
Overall capacity: 17,800
 
 
 
       
  Match officials  
   
Eightenn referees participated in the tournament. 14 from UEFA, and 4 from CONMEBOL. Nikolai Latyshev from Soviet Union refereed four matches.
 
   
 
       
       
  TOURNAMENT SUMMARY  
   

Action from all four groups kicked off on May 30. Soviet Union and Yugoslavia topped the Group A and advanced to the quarter-finals. One of the most unpredictable score of the tournament occurred in this group in the match between Soviet Union and Colombia, team that was taking part in the World Cup for the first time. The Soviets were comfortably leading the match 4-1, but the Colombians scored three goals in a ten-minute span to tie the game, including the first and only Olympic goal in any World Cup. Colombia completed the most amazing comebacks ever in the World Cup history.

West Germany and The Chilean hosts had no problems winning Group B ahead of Italy and Switzerland. The infamous first-round match between Italy and hosts Chile, which became known as the "Battle of Santiago", took place in this group at the Estadio Nacional, in Santiago de Chile on 2 June 1962. In fact, the atmosphere of this match had been inflamed a few days before the game when two Italian journalists, Antonio Ghirelli and Corrado Pizzinelli, wrote terrible comments on the charms and morals of Chilean women and the condition of the Chilean capital. The articles obviously caused an outcry in the Chilean people. Local newspapers also took advantage of the situation to inflame the Chilean population. The match was extremely violent and was more like a wrestling show than a football match. The first foul occurred within 12 seconds of the kick-off. After 12 minutes of the game, the Italian player Giorgio Ferrini was sent-off and had to be dragged from the field by police when he refused to walk. In minute 38, the Italian player Mario David fouled Leonel Sanchez, who got up and gave him a fist blow that was observed throughout the stadium. David fell to the floor knockout. The only ones who did not observe the fault were the English referee and Mexican lineman Fernando Buergo. Behind the referee's Leonel Sanchez took a swipe at Humberto Maschio, breaking his nose. A few minutes later, David applied a violent flying kick to Sanchez and was immediately sent-off from the party. In the second half, the fight continued. Two players fought in the middle of the field while the referee tried to separate them. Inexplicably did not sent-off any of them. The English referee Kenneth Aston said the match was uncontrollable as the players were punching and kicking each other. For the record, Chile won 2-0. The teams had to leave the field under the protection of the police.

As expected, the defending champions Brazil topped Group D ahead of Czechoslovakia. Pelé was injured in the second group match against Czechoslovakia and did not see any more action in the tournament. Finally, Hungary and England topped the Group D and advanced to the quarter-finals. England had the same number of points as Argentina but progressed due to a superior goal average. This was the first time such a requirement had been necessary in a World Cup finals tournament. Argentina became also the first and only team in World Cup history to be eliminated on goal average.

 
   
 
 
  Czechoslovakia's team
Yugoslavia's team
 
   

The quarter-finals produced some surprising results.  Chile defeated Soviet Union, the pre-tournament favourites, 2-1. Brazil, meanwhile, dispatched England 3-1 thanks to a brilliant performance from Garrincha, who scored two goals. Yugoslavia, having lost to West Germany in the quarter-finals in the previous two World Cups, disposed of West Germany 1-0 thanks to Radaković's goal at the end of the game, while Czechoslovakia progressed to the semi-finals at the expense of neighbouring Hungary.

In the semi-finals, Brazil had no contemplation of the hosts, Chile, and defeated them 4-2 with two goals each of Garrincha and Vavá. This game saw Garrincha sent off for Brazil and Honorino Landa sent off for Chile. Czechoslovakia, on the other hand, continued their winning streak towards the final as they beat Yugoslavia 3-1. The third place match saw the victory of the hosts over Yugoslavia 1-0, with a winning goal in the last minute of the match.

The 1962 FIFA World Cup Final was contested at the new Estadio Nacional in Santiago de Chile, with the splendid backcloth of the snow-capped Andes, before a crowd of 68,000, for the South American team and the defending champion, Brazil, and Czechoslovakia. Brazil beat the European team 3-1, thus getting their second championship in a row. The Czechs with the great Josef Masopust had a great team, but still it was hard to imagine any other outcome in the tournament showpiece than a victory for Brazil. The brazilians looked truly unstoppable. This was the second time a world champion defended the title. The match was fantastic. Brazil managed to come from a goal down to win the final 3-1. Garricha, the fantastic right winger, was the hero of Brazil. French newspaper L'Equipe was not exaggerating when they described him as the most extraordinary right winger football has known. It is worth noting that Garrincha was sent off in the semi-final; however, he was not suspended for the final. All the other players that were sent off during the tournament received a one match ban. Garrincha only received a reprieve from FIFA and was allowed to play the final.

 
   
 
Horst Szymaniak (far left): Chile 0-2 West Germany
The Battle of Santiago
 
     
First Round - Group 1
   
   
Pos
Flag
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
1
 Soviet Union
3
2
1
0
8
5
3
5
2
 Yugoslavia
3
2
0
1
8
3
5
4
3
 Uruguay
3
1
0
2
4
6
-2
2
4
 Colombia
3
0
1
2
5
11
-6
1
   
   
Match 1
2-1
Colombia  
Date: 30 May 1962 F. Zuluaga 19'
Stadium: Estadio Carlos Dittborn  
Venue: Arica    
Attendance: 7,908  
Referee: Andor Dorogi (Hungary)  
   
Match 5
Soviet Union
2-0
Yugoslavia  
Date: 31 May 1962  
Stadium: Estadio Carlos Dittborn  
Venue: Arica    
Attendance:  9,622    
Referee: Albert Dusch (West Germany)  
   
Match 9
Yugoslavia
3-1
Uruguay  
Date: 2 June 1962 A. Cabrera 19'
Stadium: Estadio Carlos Dittborn  
Venue: Arica  
Attendance:  8,829  
Referee: Karol Galba (Czechoslovakia)  
   
Match 13
Soviet Union
4-4
Colombia  
Date: 3 June 1962
V. Ivanov 8', 11'
G. Aceros 21'
Stadium: Estadio Carlos Dittborn M. Coll 68'
Venue: Arica A. Rada 72'
Attendance:  8,040   M. Klinger 76'
Referee: João Etzel Filho (Brazil)  
   
Match 17
Soviet Union
2-1
Uruguay  
Date: 6 June 1962 J. Sasía 54'
Stadium: Estadio Carlos Dittborn  
Venue: Arica
 
Attendance:  9,973  
Referee: Cesare Jonni (Italy)  
   
Match 21
Yugoslavia
5-0
Colombia  
Date: 7 June 1962
M. Galić 20', 61'
 
Stadium: Estadio Carlos Dittborn
D. Jerković 25', 87'
 
Venue: Arica  
Attendance:  7,167  
Referee: Carlos Robles (Chile)  
   
   
First Round - Group 2  
   
   
Pos
Flag
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
1
 West Germany
3
2
1
0
4
1
3
5
2
 Chile
3
2
0
1
5
3
2
4
3
 Italy
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
3
4
 Switzerland
3
0
0
3
2
8
-6
0
   
   
Match 2
3-1
Switzerland  
Date: 30 May 1962
L. Sánchez 44', 55'
R. Wüthrich 6'
Stadium: Estadio Nacional  
Venue: Santiago    
Attendance:  65,006  
Referee: Kenneth Aston (England)  
   
Match 6
0-0
Italy  
Date: 31 May 1962    
Stadium: Estadio Nacional    
Venue: Santiago    
Attendance:  65,440  
Referee: Robert Holley Davidson (Scotland)  
   
Match 10
2-0
Italy  
Date: 2 June 1962    
Stadium: Estadio Nacional  
Venue: Santiago    
Attendance:  66,057  
Referee: Kenneth Aston (England)    
   
Match 14
2-1
Switzerland  
 Date: 3 June 1962 H. Schneiter 73'
Stadium: Estadio Nacional  
Venue: Santiago
 
Attendance:  64,922
 
Referee: Leo Horn (Netherlands)    
   
Match 18
2-0
Chile  
Date: 6 June 1962  
Stadium: Estadio Nacional  
Venue: Santiago    
Attendance:  67,224    
Referee: Robert Holley Davidson (Scotland)  
   
Match 22  
3-0
Switzerland  
Date: 7 June 1962    
Stadium: Estadio Nacional
G. Bulgarelli 65', 67'
 
Venue: Santiago
 
Attendance:  59,828  
Referee: Nikolay Latyshev (Soviet Union)  
   
   
First Round - Group 3
   
   
Pos
Flag
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
1
 Brazil
3
2
1
0
4
1
3
5
2
 Czechoslovakia
3
1
1
1
2
3
-1
3
3
 Mexico
3
1
0
2
3
4
-1
2
4
 Spain
3
1
0
2
2
3
-1
2
   
   
Match 3
2-0
Mexico  
Date: 30 May 1962  
Stadium: Estadio Sausalito
Pelé 73'
 
Venue: Viña del Mar    
Attendance:  10,484  
Referee: Gottfried Dienst (Switzerland)  
   
Match 7
Czechoslovakia
1-0
Spain  
Date: 31 May 1962  
Stadium: Estadio Sausalito
 
Venue: Viña del Mar    
Attendance:  12,700    
Referee: Carl Erich Steiner (Austria)  
       
Match 11
0-0
Czechoslovakia  
Date: 2 June 1962    
Stadium: Estadio Sausalito    
Venue: Viña del Mar    
Attendance:  14,903  
Referee: Pierre Schwinte (France)  
   
Match 15
1-0
Mexico  
Date: 3 June 1962  
Stadium: Estadio Sausalito    
Venue: Viña del Mar    
Attendance:  11,875  
Referee: Branko Tesanić (Yugoslavia)  
   
Match 19
2-1
Spain  
Date: 6 June 1962
Amarildo 72', 86'
Adelardo 35'
Stadium: Estadio Sausalito    
Venue: Viña del Mar    
Attendance:  18,715    
Referee: Sergio Bustamante (Chile)  
       
Match 23
3-1
Czechoslovakia  
Date: 7 June 1962 V. Mašek 1'
Stadium: Estadio Sausalito
A. Del Águila 29'
 
Venue: Viña del Mar  
Attendance:  10,648  
Referee: Gottfried Dienst (Switzerland)  
 
 
First Round - Group 4
   
   
Pos
Flag
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
1
 Hungary
3
2
1
0
8
2
6
5
2
 England
3
1
1
1
4
3
1
3
3
 Argentina
3
1
1
1
2
3
-1
3
4
 Bulgaria
3
0
1
2
1
7
-6
1
   
   
Match 4
1-0
Bulgaria  
Date: 30 May 1962  
Stadium: Estadio El Teniente    
Venue: Rancagua    
Attendance:  7,134  
Referee: Juan Gardeazábal Garay (Spain)  
   
Match 8
Hungary
2-1
England  
Date: 31 May 1962 R. Flowers 60'
Stadium: Estadio El Teniente  
Venue: Rancagua    
Attendance:  7,938    
Referee: Leo Horn (Netherlands)  
       
Match 12
3-1
Argentina  
Date: 2 June 1962 J. Sanfilippo 81'
Stadium: Estadio El Teniente  
Venue: Rancagua  
Attendance:  9,794  
Referee: Nikolay Latyshev (Soviet Union)  
   
Match 16
Hungary
6-1
Bulgaria  
Date: 3 June 1962
F. Albert 1', 6', 53'
G. Asparuhov 64'
Stadium: Estadio El Teniente
L. Tichy 8', 70'
 
Venue: Rancagua  
Attendance:  7,442  
Referee: Juan Gardeazábal Garay (Spain)  
   
Match 20
Hungary
0-0
Argentina  
Date: 6 June 1962    
Stadium: Estadio El Teniente    
Venue: Rancagua    
Attendance:  7,945    
Referee: Arturo Yamasaki Maldonado (Peru)  
       
Match 24
0-0
Bulgaria  
Date: 7 June 1962    
Stadium: Estadio El Teniente    
Venue: Rancagua    
Attendance:  5,700  
Referee: Antoine Blavier (Belgium)  
     
Quarter-finals
   
Match 25
2-1
Soviet Union  
Date: 10 June 1962 I. Chislenko 26'
Stadium: Estadio Carlos Dittborn  
Venue: Arica    
Attendance:  17,268  
Referee: Leo Horn ( Netherlands)  
   
Match 26
Czechoslovakia
1-0
Hungary  
Date: 10 June 1962  
Stadium: Estadio El Teniente    
Venue: Rancagua    
Attendance:  11,690    
Referee: Nikolay Latyshev (Soviet Union)  
       
Match 27
3-1
England  
Date: 10 June 1962
Garrincha 31', 59'
G. Hitchens 38'
Stadium: Estadio Sausalito  
Venue: Viña del Mar    
Attendance:  17,736  
Referee: Pierre Schwinte (France)  
   
Match 28
Yugoslavia
1-0
West Germany  
Date: 10 June 1962  
Stadium: Estadio Nacional    
Venue: Santiago    
Attendance:  63,324    
Referee: Arturo Yamasaki Maldonado (Peru)    
   
     
Semi-finals
   
Match 29
Czechoslovakia
3-1
Yugoslavia  
Date: 13 June 1962   D. Jerković 69'
Stadium: Estadio Sausalito
A. Scherer 80', 84'
 
Venue: Viña del Mar    
Attendance:  5,890  
Referee: Gottfried Dienst (Switzerland)  
   
Match 30
4-2
Chile  
Date: 13 June 1962
Garrincha 9', 32'
  J. Toro 42'
Stadium: Estadio Nacional
Vavá 47', 78'
L. Sánchez 61'
Venue: Santiago    
Attendance:  76,594  
Referee: Arturo Yamasaki Maldonado (Peru)  
   
     
Third-place Match
   
   
Match 31
1-0
Yugoslavia  
Date: 16 June 1962    
Stadium: Estadio Nacional
 
Venue: Santiago    
Attendance:  66,697  
Referee: Juan Gardeazábal Garay (Spain)  
   
     
Final
   
   
Match 32
3-1
Czechoslovakia  
Date: 17 June 1962   J. Masopust 15'
Stadium: Estadio Nacional
Zito 69'
 
Venue: Santiago
Vavá 78'
 
Attendance:  68,679  
  Referee: Nikolay Latyshev (Soviet Union)  
         
   
 
1962 World Cup Finals: Brazil captain Mauro greets Czechoslovakia captain Novak.
Garrincha runs to congratulate team-mate Amarildo after his goal for Brazil in their 3-1 win over Czechoslovakia.
 
   
 
"It was such a mature and experienced side that not even the absence of Pelé could upset us." Mario Zagallo speaking before the final.
   
 
Everybody thinks that Brazil are red-hot favourites, but we’re ready to spring a surprise. I’ve got faith in my players. They’re fit, they’re skilful and they’re in a better frame of mind than they were in the first game against Brazil. We can win.” Czechoslovakia coach Rudolf Vytlacil, speaking a few days before the game.
   
 
I was inconsolable and I asked the heads of the delegation if I could go home. Their reaction was to sit me down and persuade me that I could do more to help team morale if I stayed in Chile. Dr Paulo [Machado de Carvalho] said to me: ‘If we keep on saying you might be fit for the Final, it will give them another thing to worry about.’ I realised then that they were right.” Pelé, writing in his autobiography, reflects on his disappointment at being told he would not be fit for the Final.
   
   
Standings
     
 
Pos
Flag
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Perf.
Sum(P/Nt)
Title
Pt
Ap.
1
 Brazil
6
5
1
0
14
5
9
11
1.83
0.0625
16.00
C
7
2
 Czechoslovakia
6
3
1
2
7
7
0
7
1.17
0.1250
8.00
F
5
3
 Chile
6
4
0
2
10
8
2
8
1.33
0.1875
6.00
TP
3
4
 Yugoslavia
6
3
0
3
10
7
3
6
1.00
0.2500
4.00
FP
5
5
 Hungary
4
2
1
1
8
3
5
5
1.25
0.3125
2.00
2R
5
6
 Soviet Union
4
2
1
1
9
7
2
5
1.25
0.3750
2.00
2R
2
7
 West Germany
4
2
1
1
4
2
2
5
1.25
0.4375
2.00
2R
5
8
 England
4
1
1
2
5
6
-1
3
0.75
0.5000
2.00
2R
4
9
 Italy
3
1
1
1
3
2
1
3
1.00
0.5625
1.00
1R
5
10
 Argentina
3
1
1
1
2
3
-1
3
1.00
0.6250
1.00
1R
4
11
 Mexico
3
1
0
2
3
4
-1
2
0.67
0.7500
1.00
1R
5
12
 Spain
3
1
0
2
2
3
-1
2
0.67
0.8125
1.00
1R
3
13
 Uruguay
3
1
0
2
4
6
-2
2
0.67
0.8125
1.00
1R
4
14
 Colombia
3
0
1
2
5
11
-6
1
0.33
0.8750
1.00
1R
1
15
 Bulgaria
3
0
1
2
1
7
-6
1
0.33
0.9375
1.00
1R
1
16
 Switzerland
3
0
0
3
2
8
-6
0
0.33
1.0000
1.00
1R
5
 
       
 
 Where: Perf.: Performance   Sum(P/Nt): Position between all the participant teams   Pt: Reached round
 PtsS: Points scored for statistics   Ap: Appearances in world cups
     
       
  STATISTICS
     
     
Goalscorers
   
 
Pos
Player
Team
Flag
Goals
1
 Vavá  Brazil
4
 Garrincha  Brazil
4
 L. Sánchez  Chile
4
 F. Albert  Hungary
4
 V. Ivanov  Soviet Union
4
 D. Jerković  Yugoslavia
4
7
 Amarildo  Brazil
3
 A. Scherer  Czechoslovakia
3
 L. Tichy  Hungary
3
 M. Galić  Yugoslavia
3
11
 J. Ramírez  Chile
2
 E. Rojas  Chile
2
 J. Toro  Chile
2
 R. Flowers  England
2
 G. Bulgarelli  Italy
2
 I. Chislenko  Soviet Union
2
 V. Ponedelnik  Soviet Union
2
 J. Sasía  Uruguay
2
 U. Seeler  West Germany
2
20
 H. Facundo  Argentina
1
 J. Sanfilippo  Argentina
1
 Pelé  Brazil
1
 Zito  Brazil
1
 Zagallo  Brazil
1
 G. Asparuhov  Bulgaria
1
 A. Rada  Colombia
1
 M. Klinger  Colombia
1
 M. Coll  Colombia
1
 F. Zuluaga  Colombia
1
 G. Aceros  Colombia
1
 J. Štibrányi  Czechoslovakia
1
 V. Mašek  Czechoslovakia
1
 J. Kadraba  Czechoslovakia
1
 J. Masopust  Czechoslovakia
1
 J. Greaves  England
1
 G. Hitchens  England
1
 B. Charlton  England
1
 E. Solymosi  Hungary
1
 B. Mora  Italy
1
 I. Díaz  Mexico
1
 A. Del Águila  Mexico
1
 H. Hernández  Mexico
1
 A. Mamykin  Soviet Union
1
 J. Peiró  Spain
1
 Adelardo  Spain
1
 H. Schneiter  Switzerland
1
 R. Wüthrich  Switzerland
1
 L. Cubilla  Uruguay
1
 A. Cabrera  Uruguay
1
 A. Brülls  West Germany
1
 H. Szymaniak  West Germany
1
 V. Melić  Yugoslavia
1
 P. Radaković  Yugoslavia
1
 J. Skoblar  Yugoslavia
1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
   
        
Overall top goal scorers
   
 
In gold the topscorers (golden shoe) of the tournament. The complete list is available at: Goleadores-1962
   
Pos
Player
 Team
Flag
Goals
WC-1
WC-2
1
 Just Fontaine  France
13
58
2
 Sándor Kocsis  Hungary
11
54
3
 Helmut Rahn  West Germany
10
54
58
4
 Vavá  Brazil
9
58
62
5
 Guillermo Stábile  Argentina
8
30
 Leônidas  Brazil
8
34
38
 Ademir  Brazil
8
50
 Oscar Míguez  Uruguay
8
50
54
9
 Oldřich Nejedlý  Czechoslovakia
7
34
38
 Hans Schäfer  West Germany
7
54
58
 Pelé  Brazil
7
58
62
 Lajos Tichy  Hungary
7
58
62
13
 György Sárosi  Hungary
6
34
38
 Erich Probst  Austria
6
54
 Josef Hügi  Switzerland
6
54
 Max Morlock  West Germany
6
54
17
 Pedro Cea  Uruguay
5
30
 Gyula Zsengellér  Hungary
5
38
 Silvio Piola  Italy
5
38
 Juan Schiaffino  Uruguay
5
50
54
 Peter McParland  Northern Ireland
5
58
 
   
   
Interesting facts
   
 
Milestone goals. The goal number 600 in the World Cups history was scored by Dražan Jerković from Yugoslavia in Arica on 2 June 1962. Jerković scored the 3-1. Yugoslavia defeated Uruguay 3-1.
France and Sweden, which had ended in the second and third place in the previous World Cup, fail to qualify for the tournament in Chile.
This was the second time that a country was able to retain the title. Italy had managed the 1934 and 1938 championships.
Vavá was the first player to score in two World Cup finals. Vavá scored the first two goals in the 1958 World Cup Final, and the third goal in the 1962 World Cup Final.
Vaclav Masek from Czechoslovakia scored a mere 15 seconds into the game against Mexico to set up a new record.
Marcos Coll from Colombia, also known as El Olímpico, was the first and only player to score an Olympic goal in any FIFA World Cup, beating legendary goalkeeper Lev Yashin in a 4-4 draw against the Soviets. Colombia was losing 4-1 with less than 25 minutes remaining. Marcos Coll scored the second and Olympic goal.
The match between Colombia and Soviet Union finished in a 4–4 tie after a spectacular come back by Colombia from 4–1 to draw the match, making it the biggest comeback in World Cup history. The match was held in Arica on 3 June 1962.
Argentina became the first and only team in World Cup history to be eliminated on goal average.  England advanced from Group 4 in second place ahead of Argentina on goal average.
This was the first World cup without playoff game.
After 5 World Cups and 13 matches without a victory, Mexico earned his first win beating the runner-up Czechoslovakia 3 to 1.
Hat-tricks: Flórián Albert (Hungary)
The youngest player was Gianni Rivera from Italy: 18y (18 August 1943). The youngest goalkeeper was Wolfgang Fahrian from West Germany: 20y (31 May 1941). The youngest scorer was Georgi Asparoukhov from Bulgaria: 19y (4 May 1943). The youngest champion was Pelé from Brazil: 21y (23 October 1940). The youngest captain was Jorge Toro from Chile: 23y (10 January 1939).
The oldest player was Nilton Santos from Brazil: 37y (16 May 1925). The oldest goalkeeper was Gyula Grocsis from Hungary: 36y (4 February 1926). The oldest scorer was Francisco Zuluaga from Colombia: 33y (4 February 1929). The oldest champion was Nilton Santos from Brazil. The oldest captain was also Gyula Grocsis from Hungary.
   
   
  Teams that contributed players for national teams
   
 
The most important teams that contributed players to the national teams are shown in the table below. The complete list is available at: Teams-Countries-Players-1962
   
 
Pos
Logo
Team
NoP
Country
Flag
1
  Universidad de Chile
9
  Chile
File:Club Nacional de Football's logo.png
  Nacional
9
3
  PFC CSKA Sofia
8
  Bulgaria
  A.C. Milan
8
  Italy
5
  Santos FC
7
  Brazil
  Dukla Prague
7
  Czechoslovakia
  CD Guadalajara
7
  Mexico
  Barcelona
7
  Spain
  Real Madrid
7
  Spain
File:Escudo de Peñarol.svg
  Peñarol
7
11
  River Plate
6
  FC Torpedo Moscow
6
  Soviet Union
13
  San Lorenzo
5
File:Botafogo de Futebol e Regatas logo.svg
  Botafogo
5
  Brazil
File:Colo-Colo.svg
  Colo-Colo
5
  Chile
  Independiente Santa Fe
5
  Vasas SC
5
  Hungary
  Lausanne Sports
5
  Switzerland
  Red Star Belgrade
5
  Yugoslavia
20
File:Boca Juniors logo.png
  Boca Juniors
4
  PFC Levski Sofia
4
  Bulgaria
  América de Cali
4
  Atlético Nacional
4
  Újpest FC
4
  Hungary
  MTK Budapest FC
4
  Hungary
  Ferencvárosi TC
4
  Hungary
  Bologna
4
  Italy
  Atlético de Madrid
4
  Spain
  1. FC Köln
4
  West Germany
  GNK Dinamo Zagreb
4
  Yugoslavia
  FK Partizan
4
  Yugoslavia
   
        
Cumulative teams contributions
   
 

The complete list is available at: Teams-Countries-Players-1962

   
 
Pos
Log
Team
Country
Flag
Tot
30
34
38
50
54
58
62
1
File:Club Nacional de Football's logo.png
  Nacional
32
9
1
5
8
9
2
File:Escudo de Peñarol.svg
  Peñarol
31
5
1
9
9
7
3
File:Botafogo de Futebol e Regatas logo.svg
  Botafogo
  Brazil
28
4
9
5
1
1
3
5
4
  SK Rapid Wien
  Austria
24
5
4
10
5
  Juventus   Italy
24
10
2
4
5
1
2
  Red Star Belgrade
  Yugoslavia
24
8
5
6
5
7
  MTK Budapest FC   Hungary
23
3
7
6
3
4
  Internazionale   Italy
23
4
5
5
6
1
2
9
  SK Slavia Praha
  Czechoslovakia
22
10
9
2
1
  Ferencvárosi TC   Hungary
22
6
8
1
3
4
11
  Vasco da Gama
  Brazil
21
4
2
1
8
3
3
  Dukla Prague
  Czechoslovakia
21
7
7
7
13
  Fluminense
  Brazil
20
5
5
2
4
1
3
  AC Sparta Prague
  Czechoslovakia
20
6
8
2
2
2
  Grasshopper-Club Zürich   Switzerland
20
6
9
1
3
1
16
File:Colo-Colo.svg
  Colo-Colo
  Chile
19
8
6
5
  Újpest FC   Hungary
19
7
5
2
1
4
File:Escudo de Olimpia.png
  Club Olimpia
  Paraguay
19
5
6
8
  FK Partizan
  Yugoslavia
19
7
5
3
4
20
  CD Guadalajara
  Mexico
18
3
2
6
7
21
  São Paulo FC
  Brazil
17
4
4
4
3
2
  Servette FC   Switzerland
17
5
4
3
3
2
23
  GNK Dinamo Zagreb
  Yugoslavia
16
2
5
5
4
24
  FC Barcelona   Spain
15
3
5
7
 
  Lausanne Sports   Switzerland
15
2
1
3
4
5
26
  FC Admira Wacker Mödling
  Austria
14
6
1
4
3
  Flamengo
  Brazil
14
2
3
2
3
4
  Budapest Honvéd FC   Hungary
14
1
8
4
1
  A.C. Milan   Italy
14
1
2
2
1
8
  Real Madrid   Spain
14
5
1
1
7
31
  River Plate
13
7
6
  FK Austria Wien
  Austria
13
3
3
4
3
  K. Beerschot V.A.C.   Belgium
13
1
8
4
File:Atlante FC logo.svg
  Atlante
  Mexico
13
7
1
3
1
1
35
File:Boca Juniors logo.png
  Boca Juniors
12
4
4
4
  Universidad de Chile
  Chile
12
3
9
  Lille OSC
  France
12
4
3
4
1
  Stade de Reims
  France
12
6
6
  Bologna   Italy
12
2
3
1
2
4
File:OFK Beograd.svg
  OFK Beograd
  Yugoslavia
12
8
1
3
        
        
Leagues that countributed players for national teams
   
 
The most important leagues that contributed players to the national teams are shown in the table below.

   
 
Pos
Team
Flag
NoP
Per
 
350
 
1
  Italy
25
7.14%
2
22
6.28%
  Brazil
22
6.28%
  Bulgaria
22
6.28%
  Chile
22
6.28%
22
6.28%
  Czechoslovakia
22
6.28%
  Hungary
22
6.28%
  Mexico
22
6.28%
  Soviet Union
22
6.28%
  Yugoslavia
22
6.28%
12
  England
21
6.00%
  Spain
21
6.00%
21
6.00%
  West Germany
21
6.00%
16
  Switzerland
18
5.14%
17
  France
2
0.57%
18
  Paraguay
1
0.28%
   
   
Cumulative contributions
   
 
Pos
Team
Flag
Total
30
34
38
50
54
58
62
Per
Cha
 
2183
243
317
316
270
345
343
350
 
1
 Brazil
149
24
15
22
22
22
22
22
6.82%
0
2
 England
127
22
29
55
21
5.82%
+1
3
 Italy
119
22
22
22
22
6
25
5.45%
+1
4
 France
112
19
23
25
22
21
2
5.13%
-2
5
 Hungary
109
22
21
22
22
22
4.99%
0
6
 Czechoslovakiakia
105
17
22
22
22
22
4.81%
+1
 Mexico
105
17
22
22
22
22
4.81%
+1
8
 Switzerland
102
23
20
19
22
18
4.67%
-2
9
 Yugoslavia
101
13
22
22
22
22
4.63%
+1
10
 West Germany
96
22
13
22
18
21
4.40%
+1
11
 Uruguay
89
22
2
22
22
21
4.08%
+3
12
 Argentina
84
22
18
22
22
3.85%
+4
13
 Belgium
83
16
22
23
22
3.80%
-6
14
 Austria
75
22
9
22
22
3.43%
-3
15
 Sweden
73
16
22
18
17
3.34%
-2
16
 Paraguay
67
22
22
22
1
3.07%
-1
17
 Spain
66
22
22
1
21
3.02%
+2
18
 Chile
62
19
21
22
2.84%
+3
19
 United States
52
16
19
17
2.38%
-2
20
 Romania
51
15
15
21
2.34%
-2
21
 Soviet Union
44
22
22
2.01%
+3
22
 Netherlands
43
22
21
1.97%
-2
23
 Bolivia
36
17
19
1.65%
-1
24
 Scotland
32
15
17
1.46%
-1
25
 Bulgaria
22
22
1.01%
22
22
1.01%
 Poland
22
22
1.01%
-1
 Turkey
22
22
1.01%
-1
29
 Norway
21
21
0.96%
-2
 Peru
21
21
0.96%
-2
31
 Indonesia
17
17
0.78%
-2
32
 Cuba
15
15
0.69%
-2
 Egypt
15
15
0.69%
-2
15
15
0.69%
-2
35
 Wales
9
9
0.41%
-2
 
 
H-index, i-10 index and ne
 
 
Pos
Team
Flag
h-index
i-10 index
ne
Cha
1
 Brazil
8
6
18
0
2
 Mexico
7
4
18
+4
3
 Italy
6
6
17
+4
4
 France
6
4
31
-2
5
 Switzerland
6
4
20
-2
6
 Yugoslavia
6
4
13
-2
7
 England
6
2
34
+1
8
 Belgium
6
2
20
-3
9
 Czechoslovakiakia
5
5
20
+2
10
 Hungary
5
5
13
-1
11
 Austria
5
4
10
-1
12
 Paraguay
5
3
9
0
13
 Argentina
5
2
26
+3
14
 Sweden
5
1
20
-1
15
 West Germany
5
0
39
0
16
 Spain
4
3
14
+2
17
 Chile
4
3
13
+4
18
 Uruguay
4
2
13
+2
19
 Romania
4
1
18
-5
20
 Soviet Union
4
1
9
+6
21
 United States
4
0
25
-4
22
 Bolivia
4
0
13
-4
23
 Netherlands
3
0
23
-1
24
 Norway
3
0
11
-1
 Poland
3
0
11
-1
 Scotland
3
0
11
-1
27
3
0
8
28
 Turkey
3
0
7
-2
29
 Cuba
3
0
5
-1
30
 Peru
2
1
6
-1
31
 Indonesia
2
0
12
-1
32
 Bulgaria
2
0
8
33
 Egypt
2
0
6
-2
34
 Wales
2
0
2
-2
35
1
1
5
-2
   
 
h-index is the largest number h such that h teams have at least h players.  i-10 index is the number of teams with at least 10 players.  nt is the number of teams. cha is the number of positions won or lost compared to the previous world cup.
 
        
Coaches contributed by country
   
 
The coaches contributed by country are shown in the table below. Argentina contributed three coaches.

   
 
Pos
Country
Flag
NoC
1
3
2
  Austria
1
  Brazil
1
  Bulgaria
1
  Chile
1
  Czechoslovakia
1
  England
1
  Hungary
1
  Italy
1
  Mexico
1
  Soviet Union
1
1
  West Germany
1
  Yugoslavia
1

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The coach of Brazilcelebrating after winning the championship
 
 
 
   
   
Cumulative contributions (coaches)
   
Pos
Team
Flag
Tot
30
34
38
50
54
58
62
 
105
13
16
15
13
16
16
16
1
10
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
  Hungary
9
1
2
2
2
1
1
3
7
2
1
1
3
  Austria
7
2
1
2
1
1
  Brazil
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
  Italy
6
1
1
2
1
1
7
  Czechoslovakia
5
1
1
1
1
1
  Spain
5
1
1
1
1
1
  West Germany
5
1
1
1
1
1
  Yugoslavia
5
1
1
1
1
1
11
  France
4
1
1
1
1
  Scotland
4
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
14
  Mexico
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
16
  Belgium
2
1
1
  Chile
2
1
1
  Paraguay
2
1
1
  Romania
2
1
1
  Soviet Union
2
       
1
1
  Switzerland
2
1
1
22
  Bolivia
1
1
  Bulgaria
1
           
1
  Cuba
1
1
  Netherlands
1
1
  Northern Ireland
1
       
1
  Norway
1
1
  Poland
1
1
1
     
1
  Wales
1
       
1
 
 
 
Attendance
   
 
The total attendance at the World Cup as well as both the total and average attendance for each of the national teams is shown in the table below.

   
 
Pos
Flag
Team
Total
#M
Average
  
893,172
32
27,912
1
 Chile
358,846
6
59,808
2
 West Germany
260,910
4
65,228
3
 Brazil
207,111
6
34,519
4
 Italy
191,325
3
63,775
5
 Switzerland
189,756
3
63,252
6
 Yugoslavia
161,529
6
26,922
7
 Czechoslovakia
124,510
6
20,752
8
 Soviet Union
44,903
4
11,226
9
 Spain
43,290
3
14,430
10
 England
41,168
4
10,292
11
 Hungary
35,015
4
8,754
12
 Mexico
33,007
3
11,002
13
 Uruguay
26,710
3
8,903
14
 Argentina
24,873
3
8,291
15
 Colombia
23,115
3
7,705
16
 Bulgaria
20,276
3
6,759
   
 
Cumulative attendance
   
Pos
Flag
Team
Total
#M
Average
Ch
  
4,856,074
168
28,905
1
  Brazil
1,398,336
29
48,218
0
2
  West Germany
759,742
22
34,534
+2
3
  Italy
699,093
17
41,123
0
4
  Uruguay
694,103
16
43,381
-2
5
  Yugoslavia
557,207
19
29,327
+3
6
  Switzerland
501,381
15
33,425
+6
7
  Sweden
492,857
16
30,804
-2
8
  Chile
469,548
12
39,129
+10
9
  Spain
454,854
12
37,905
-3
10
  Hungary
442,831
19
23,307
-3
11
  Czechoslovakia
371,433
19
19,549
+4
12
  England
370,281
14
26,449
-3
13
  Argentina
348,821
12
29,068
-3
14
  Austria
311,889
12
25,991
-3
15
  France
283,434
14
20,245
-2
16
  Mexico
280,134
14
20,010
-2
17
  Soviet Union
221,500
9
24,611
-1
18
  United States
162,701
7
23,243
-1
19
  Belgium
106,800
6
17,800
0
20
  Paraguay
105,306
7
15,044
0
21
  Romania
96,571
5
19,314
0
22
  Scotland
93,810
5
18,762
0
23
  Wales
89,526
5
17,905
0
24
  Northern Ireland
64,807
5
12,961
0
25
  Peru
60,284
2
30,142
0
26
  Bolivia
49,056
3
16,352
0
27
  Turkey
49,000
3
16,333
0
28
  Netherlands
44,000
2
22,000
0
29
  Colombia
23,115
3
7,705
30
  Cuba
22,000
3
7,333
-1
31
  Bulgaria
20,276
3
6,759
32
  Norway
19,000
1
19,000
-2
33
  South Korea
17,000
2
8,500
-2
34
  Poland
13,452
1
13,452
-2
35
  Indonesia
9,000
1
9,000
-2
  Egypt
9,000
1
9,000
        
      

  Awards and best players
   
 
The top scorers (Golden Shoe) of the tournament were Flórián Albert from Hungary, Garrincha from Brazil, Valentin Ivanov from Soviet Union, Dražan Jerković from Yugoslavia, Leonel Sánchez from Chile, and Vavá from Brazil, , who would go on to score four goals. The names that people probably remember from those times are:

    
 
   
Viliam Schrojf (1931-2007)
Josef Masopust (1931-2015)
Valery Voronin (1939-1984)
     
    
  All-star team
   
 
The All-Star Team is a team of the best performers at the respective World Cup finals
   
 
 
 
  Cumulative participation by country
 
Pos
Team
Ban
Tot
30
34
38
50
54
58
62
1
  Brazil
18
2
4
1
6
5
2
  Italy
13
6
6
1
13
7
5
1
4
  Hungary
8
2
6
5
  Czechoslovakia
4
1
1
2
  Spain
4
3
1
7
  West Germany
3
       
2
1
8
2
2
  Austria
2
1
1
  France
2
       
2
  Northern Ireland
2
       
2
  Sweden
2
1
1
13
  Chile
1
           
1
  Soviet Union
1
           
1
1
1
  Yugoslavia
1
1
       
    

  CONTROVERSIES
   
 
The semi-final match between Chile and Brazil had to play in Viña del Mar as planned, but organizers prompted FIFA to switch the venues. The match was played in Santiago de Chile before a crowd of 76,600. This drew the ire of many fans from Viña del Mar who did not expect the change of venue.
Garrincha from Brazil was sent off in the semi-finals and should have suspended for the final but the Brazilian Prime Minister, Tancredo Neves, managed to get his ban overturned by FIFA. All the other players that were sent off during the tournament received a one match ban. Garrincha only received a reprieve from FIFA and was allowed to play the final.
       
    

  DID YOU KNOW?
   
 
The qualifying match between Netherlands and East Germany was not played due to visa problems. The East Germans players were not allowed to enter Netherlands so the game was never played.
Carlos Dittborn, the man that got the tournament for Chile, would not live to see the success of their tireless efforts. He died a month before the tournament starts. The headquarters of the World Cup in Arica was called Estadio Carlos Dittborn in his honor.
Spain attended the World Cup in Chile with four players from different nationalities: Puskás (Hungarian), Martínez (Paraguay), Santamaría (Uruguay) and Di Stefano (Argentina). The Spanish team was disappointing. With Helenio Herrera –soon to conquer Europe with Inter Milan- as coach, and a constellation of stars could not get past the group stage.
Alfredo di Stefano, the legendary Real Madrid forward of the 1950s, pulled a muscle prior to the competition. This injury prevented him from playing in the finals.
Ferenc Puskás (Hungary and Spain), José Santamaría (Uruguay and Spain) and José Altafini (Brazil and Italy) joined the list of players (Luis Monti and Atilio De Maria that played for Argentina in 1930 and for Italy in 1934) that played for two different national teams. In light of this, FIFA created stipulations describing that once a player represents a nation during a World Cup or its qualifying rounds the player cannot switch to another national team.
The Yugoslavian, Bosnian, Muhamed Mujić broke the leg of the Soviet Eduard Dubinski, in the first match of these teams. Albert Dusch, the German referee, was unaware of the attack, despite the broken tibia and fibula, and therefore did not sent-off to Mujić. By initiative of the Yugoslavian team, Mujić was sent home early. The injury latter caused sarcoma, which eventually contributed to Dubinsky's death in 1969 at the age of 34 years.
Pelé, who had been in shining form in the 2-0 opening win over Mexico,  suffered a groin injury in the second group match against Czechoslovakia and did not see any more action in the tournament.
As in the 1934 World Cup, some Argentine players played for other teams in the World Cup. Two of the best players of that era, Enrique Omar Sívori and Humberto Maschio, who had played several matches for Argentina and had even won the 1957 Copa América playing for Argentina, played for Italy. Sívori was elected the best European player and received the Golden Ball in 1961. On the other hand, one of the best players of all time, Alfredo Di Stéfano, born in Barracas, Buenos Aires, considered by FIFA as one of the four best players in the twentieth century along with Pelé, Maradona and Cruijff, played for the Spanish team.
One of the most violent games in World Cup history was played at the Estadio Nacional, in Santiago de Chile, between Chile, the hosts, and Italy, on 2 June 1962. Chile went on to win the match 2 to 0 and it will be remembered as the Battle of Santiago. The match referee was Ken Aston of England, the later inventor of the yellow and red cards. In fact, the battle had begun a few days before the game when two Italian journalists, Antonio Ghirelli and Corrado Pizzinelli, wrote terrible articles about Chile and its people. The article mainly talked about the beauty and morals of Chilean womanhood and the condition of the Chilean capital: "The phones don't work, taxis are as rare as faithful husbands, a cable to Europe costs an arm and a leg and a letter takes five days to turn up, and its population as prone to malnutrition, illiteracy, alcoholism and poverty. Chile is a small, proud and poor country: it has agreed to organize this World Cup in the same way as Mussolini agreed to send our air force to bomb London (they didn't arrive). The capital city has 700 hotel beds. Entire neighbourhoods are given over to open prostitution. This country and its people are proudly miserable and backwards". The articles obviously caused an outcry in the Chilean people. Local newspapers also took advantage of the situation to inflame the Chilean population. They described Italians in general as fascists, mafiosos, oversexed, and, wrote that some of Inter Milan's players had recently been involved in a doping scandal. The Italian journalists involved were forced to flee the country. The match was extremely violent and was more like a wrestling show than a football match. The first foul occurred within 12 seconds of the kick-off. After 12 minutes of the game, the Italian player Giorgio Ferrini was sent-off. Ferrini refused to leave the field and had to be taken by the police. In minute 38, the Italian player Mario David fouled Leonel Sanchez, who got up and gave him a fist blow that was observed throughout the stadium. David fell to the floor knockout. The only ones who did not observe the fault were the English referee and Mexican lineman Fernando Buergo, who was just in front of the action. Sanchez, son of a professional boxer, had broken the nose of Umberto Maschio some minutes ago. A few minutes later, David applied a violent flying kick to Sanchez and was immediately sent-off from the party. In the second half, the fight continued. Two players fought in the middle of the field while the referee tried to separate them. Inexplicably did not sent-off any of them. For the record, Chile won 2-0. The Italian teams needed police protection to leave the field safely. David Coleman, from British television, introduced the game as" the most stupid, appalling, disgusting and disgraceful exhibition of football, possibly in the history of the game. Referee Ken Aston said: “I wasn't reffing football game... I was an umpire for MILITARY manoeuvres!
   
   
 

Brazilian midfielder Didi concentrates as he plays chess

1962 FIFA World Cup presentation football plate: presented to Ken Aston
World Cup ticket
   
   
  
           Last updated: 8 September 2017
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